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One of my bucket-list items is to hike The Stawamus Chief, and I'm happy to say (or...type?) that I've partially checked that off. The Chief is a towering granite rock that overlooks the town of Squamish, which is about an hour drive north of Vancouver. It is split into three different peaks, and the reason for partially checking off this bucket-list goal is because our group only made it up the first peak (which is still an accomplishment though...or should I say, an a-chief-ment haha ok I'll stop now).


We hiked with our family friends, because the more the merrier. As we started the trail, we were greeted with a long, lovely staircase. Please excuse the next two blurry photos, I struggled a bit with the stairs.



Eventually, the staircase ended and was replaced by a dirt trail with some rocks, roots, trunks, a ladder and a silver chain. We all paced ourselves and enjoyed the little sights along the way. It's lovely just being outside and enjoying the sun and nature and each others' company. We started hiking earlier in the day too, and got to see peeks of the sunrise while hiking up which was really sweet.




I didn't get a photo of the iron ladder and chain that hikers encounter as you near the top of the chief, but it was fun using them (specifically the chain). After using the chain to guide and pull ourselves up, we had to hike the remainder of the way to the top.




At some points, the incline during the remainder of the hike had some of us scrambling on all fours so as to not lose our balance and fall. The view at the top was worth the trek and trickiness though!
Once we reached the top, we all sat, relaxed and ate our lunches while enjoying the scenery. From where we were you could see the second and third peaks too, and little hikers working their way up.

I did this hike during a time where I was overwhelmed by the stresses of school, and other personal and life happenings. I had several assignments, particularly a big paper, due in a few days and preparation for finals and such. Usually, I handle this stress by staying at home and just trying to plow through it, but sometimes that actually adds more stress. I realized that taking a breather, being outside and away from it all helps so much.

Sitting at the top of the Chief, quietly taking in the view and all of His creations helped recognize just how vast the world is, and how capable we are of taking on the little and big challenges that we encounter.



Update from Angie in the future: I ended up doing better than I thought on that big paper. Thank you Lord! Yay!

The Stawamus Chief: First Peak

One of my bucket-list items is to hike The Stawamus Chief, and I'm happy to say (or...type?) that I've partially checked that off. The Chief is a towering granite rock that overlooks the town of Squamish, which is about an hour drive north of Vancouver. It is split into three different peaks, and the reason for partially checking off this bucket-list goal is because our group only made it up the first peak (which is still an accomplishment though...or should I say, an a-chief-ment haha ok I'll stop now).


We hiked with our family friends, because the more the merrier. As we started the trail, we were greeted with a long, lovely staircase. Please excuse the next two blurry photos, I struggled a bit with the stairs.



Eventually, the staircase ended and was replaced by a dirt trail with some rocks, roots, trunks, a ladder and a silver chain. We all paced ourselves and enjoyed the little sights along the way. It's lovely just being outside and enjoying the sun and nature and each others' company. We started hiking earlier in the day too, and got to see peeks of the sunrise while hiking up which was really sweet.




I didn't get a photo of the iron ladder and chain that hikers encounter as you near the top of the chief, but it was fun using them (specifically the chain). After using the chain to guide and pull ourselves up, we had to hike the remainder of the way to the top.




At some points, the incline during the remainder of the hike had some of us scrambling on all fours so as to not lose our balance and fall. The view at the top was worth the trek and trickiness though!
Once we reached the top, we all sat, relaxed and ate our lunches while enjoying the scenery. From where we were you could see the second and third peaks too, and little hikers working their way up.

I did this hike during a time where I was overwhelmed by the stresses of school, and other personal and life happenings. I had several assignments, particularly a big paper, due in a few days and preparation for finals and such. Usually, I handle this stress by staying at home and just trying to plow through it, but sometimes that actually adds more stress. I realized that taking a breather, being outside and away from it all helps so much.

Sitting at the top of the Chief, quietly taking in the view and all of His creations helped recognize just how vast the world is, and how capable we are of taking on the little and big challenges that we encounter.



Update from Angie in the future: I ended up doing better than I thought on that big paper. Thank you Lord! Yay!

It was my sister's birthday this past weekend, and as a part of her birthday treat our family headed up towards Whistler for the weekend. We left super early as we wanted to fit in a good hike at Joffre Lakes Provincial Park which is just an hour or so past Whistler Village.


The trail has an incline, and takes hikers past the Lower, Middle and Upper Joffre lakes. The Matier glacier at the top feeds into the upper lake, and the water cascades down into the middle and lower lakes.

I first did this hike two years ago, but this was my family's first time. It is definitely a more challenging trek, but it is such a rewarding hike. Make sure to bring lots and lots of bug spray as the mosquitos are vicious (and huge), as well as water and snacks.

Right at the get-go from the trailhead you get to the lower lake which is already so stunning and a bit more still as hikers continue upwards.


After a few quick photos, we started the long trek to middle lake. In my opinion, I would say that the hike between the lower and middle lakes is the toughest part of the hike. The distance is longer compared to that between the middle and upper lakes, and the incline poses a challenge. We paced ourselves, took our water breaks (and pictures). The weather was beautiful but also super hot.





When the trail became steeper, we were quite close to giving up and turning back. Yet, hikers returning from the top of the trail would pass by us and keep egging us on, telling us that we were so close, and that what we'd see would be so worth the sweat, bug bites and aching feet.

Perseverance and support from fellow hikers. This is why I love hikes.

We finally made it to middle lake, and it's hard to put into words how excited and in awe we were of this place.

There's a well-known photo-op here, where hikers like to traverse across a long log that somewhat dips into the blue water. Of course, we went and took some pictures there.

Middle Joffre Lake with the Matier Glacier in the background.






We were unfortunately pressed for time and could not continue to the upper lake. Although it would have been a treat, we all agreed to head back down as we were also incredibly hungry.

But, for a bonus, below are pictures of the upper lake from my time hiking here two years ago with my Tito and Tita. Hikers can camp here, and you get a beautiful view if you hike and scramble up the rocks towards the glacier.

joffre lakes 2016


  



Until next time! Upper Lake, we're coming for you!

Joffre Lakes

It was my sister's birthday this past weekend, and as a part of her birthday treat our family headed up towards Whistler for the weekend. We left super early as we wanted to fit in a good hike at Joffre Lakes Provincial Park which is just an hour or so past Whistler Village.


The trail has an incline, and takes hikers past the Lower, Middle and Upper Joffre lakes. The Matier glacier at the top feeds into the upper lake, and the water cascades down into the middle and lower lakes.

I first did this hike two years ago, but this was my family's first time. It is definitely a more challenging trek, but it is such a rewarding hike. Make sure to bring lots and lots of bug spray as the mosquitos are vicious (and huge), as well as water and snacks.

Right at the get-go from the trailhead you get to the lower lake which is already so stunning and a bit more still as hikers continue upwards.


After a few quick photos, we started the long trek to middle lake. In my opinion, I would say that the hike between the lower and middle lakes is the toughest part of the hike. The distance is longer compared to that between the middle and upper lakes, and the incline poses a challenge. We paced ourselves, took our water breaks (and pictures). The weather was beautiful but also super hot.





When the trail became steeper, we were quite close to giving up and turning back. Yet, hikers returning from the top of the trail would pass by us and keep egging us on, telling us that we were so close, and that what we'd see would be so worth the sweat, bug bites and aching feet.

Perseverance and support from fellow hikers. This is why I love hikes.

We finally made it to middle lake, and it's hard to put into words how excited and in awe we were of this place.

There's a well-known photo-op here, where hikers like to traverse across a long log that somewhat dips into the blue water. Of course, we went and took some pictures there.

Middle Joffre Lake with the Matier Glacier in the background.






We were unfortunately pressed for time and could not continue to the upper lake. Although it would have been a treat, we all agreed to head back down as we were also incredibly hungry.

But, for a bonus, below are pictures of the upper lake from my time hiking here two years ago with my Tito and Tita. Hikers can camp here, and you get a beautiful view if you hike and scramble up the rocks towards the glacier.

joffre lakes 2016


  



Until next time! Upper Lake, we're coming for you!
July had been a busy and exciting month – lots of new and fun adventures. This is one of them.


About a month ago, my family went camping alongside our family friends. It was a long, 5-hour drive up north.
Destination: Williams Lake, B.C.



Of course, camping doesn't necessarily mean staying at the camp site all the time. Relax at the site, enjoy the campfires, but when you can step out and explore!

The following days of our trip involved visiting different places around Williams Lake (and places beyond the area). It was really nice seeing the other towns in B.C. – until now my family and I have only visited areas around the lower mainland.

Stop I: Jack of Clubs Lake 

We were actually heading to another place, which you'll see in a bit, but we made a quick stop by Jack of Clubs Lake for a washroom break. Eventually this stop turned into a quick photo-op because we all realized how beautiful the lake was (this happens a lot haha!).




Stop II: Barkerville, B.C.

Our actual destination for the day was Barkerville  – a historic town, and a primary spot for the Cariboo Gold Rush in the province.

I can't recall if I've stated this in past posts, but I love historic towns. I find it so much fun to see old buildings whose architecture is still maintained, and people dressed up in the periodical clothing.

Barkerville was a long strip of these homes and shoppes – you can peek inside some of the old dental offices, homes, candy stores and bakeries...it was a time-travelling experience.







If you ever travel to B.C., I'd make Barkerville one of the places to visit. It's a bit of a drive (but a scenic one!) and well worth it.

Stop III: Williams Lake Stampede (Canada Day)

We celebrated Canada's 150th birthday (HAPPY BIRTHDAY!!) by heading to Williams Lake's parade and rodeo. For most of us, it was our first time attending an event like this. We all dressed as cowboys and cowgirls, enjoyed a pancake breakfast provided by the organizers of the event, and sang to some great songs when we sat in the bleachers of the rodeo stadium (I'm talkin' Sweet Caroline and Summer of '69 here, it was wild).




Stop IV: Farwell Canyon

I didn't know this place existed. You'd think that with living in this country for a good chunk of my life I'd be aware of these beautiful spots, but no. Just goes to show how big our world is, full of tons of hidden gems. Places that may not be as well-mentioned or well-known by many people.

Anyways. Farwell Canyon.

Unfortunately, we didn't get to step on the sand-dunes (a lot of us were just worried about safety and things like that) but we did get our dusty and sweaty selves down to the river that runs through the canyon. It was a refreshing treat.






The Camp

I can't forget about our experiences at the actual campsite. A very special thanks to the sweet family (and new-found friends) who welcomed us warmly and allowed us to stay with them. We camped out in their backyard (they lived in a large farm a short drive from Williams Lake) and got to experience riding their horses and hiking around the area!












Despite the tiring drives, family road trips are always one of my favourite things to be a part of. What an exciting experience it was to explore a bit more of my home, and with good company.

Except the mosquitos. They were absolute jerks.

-----------------------------------

Camping Road trip: OUTTAKES

Here we go!









#ExploreBC

July had been a busy and exciting month – lots of new and fun adventures. This is one of them.


About a month ago, my family went camping alongside our family friends. It was a long, 5-hour drive up north.
Destination: Williams Lake, B.C.



Of course, camping doesn't necessarily mean staying at the camp site all the time. Relax at the site, enjoy the campfires, but when you can step out and explore!

The following days of our trip involved visiting different places around Williams Lake (and places beyond the area). It was really nice seeing the other towns in B.C. – until now my family and I have only visited areas around the lower mainland.

Stop I: Jack of Clubs Lake 

We were actually heading to another place, which you'll see in a bit, but we made a quick stop by Jack of Clubs Lake for a washroom break. Eventually this stop turned into a quick photo-op because we all realized how beautiful the lake was (this happens a lot haha!).




Stop II: Barkerville, B.C.

Our actual destination for the day was Barkerville  – a historic town, and a primary spot for the Cariboo Gold Rush in the province.

I can't recall if I've stated this in past posts, but I love historic towns. I find it so much fun to see old buildings whose architecture is still maintained, and people dressed up in the periodical clothing.

Barkerville was a long strip of these homes and shoppes – you can peek inside some of the old dental offices, homes, candy stores and bakeries...it was a time-travelling experience.







If you ever travel to B.C., I'd make Barkerville one of the places to visit. It's a bit of a drive (but a scenic one!) and well worth it.

Stop III: Williams Lake Stampede (Canada Day)

We celebrated Canada's 150th birthday (HAPPY BIRTHDAY!!) by heading to Williams Lake's parade and rodeo. For most of us, it was our first time attending an event like this. We all dressed as cowboys and cowgirls, enjoyed a pancake breakfast provided by the organizers of the event, and sang to some great songs when we sat in the bleachers of the rodeo stadium (I'm talkin' Sweet Caroline and Summer of '69 here, it was wild).




Stop IV: Farwell Canyon

I didn't know this place existed. You'd think that with living in this country for a good chunk of my life I'd be aware of these beautiful spots, but no. Just goes to show how big our world is, full of tons of hidden gems. Places that may not be as well-mentioned or well-known by many people.

Anyways. Farwell Canyon.

Unfortunately, we didn't get to step on the sand-dunes (a lot of us were just worried about safety and things like that) but we did get our dusty and sweaty selves down to the river that runs through the canyon. It was a refreshing treat.






The Camp

I can't forget about our experiences at the actual campsite. A very special thanks to the sweet family (and new-found friends) who welcomed us warmly and allowed us to stay with them. We camped out in their backyard (they lived in a large farm a short drive from Williams Lake) and got to experience riding their horses and hiking around the area!












Despite the tiring drives, family road trips are always one of my favourite things to be a part of. What an exciting experience it was to explore a bit more of my home, and with good company.

Except the mosquitos. They were absolute jerks.

-----------------------------------

Camping Road trip: OUTTAKES

Here we go!









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